Preventive Stress Management in Organizations, Second Edition
Supplementary Site

 


 

Welcome to the supplementary materials website for Preventive Stress Management, Second Edition. Because stress is systemic in nature for individuals and organizations alike, the diagnosis and measurement of stress cannot be accomplished with a simple or a single assessment or test. Therefore, we have identified a full range of measures and organized them into four broad categories. Each of the four documents includes a full set of references for the reader.

 

To really understand the experience and expression of stress in any individual or organization requires information and knowledge about the person or the system. These four documents describe a full range of assessments for undertaking that diagnostic journey.

 

  • Measures of Individual Distress (PDF: 276KB): This document includes a set of measures aimed to develop behavioral, psychological, and physiological information. These measures address a range of manifestations of distress as discussed in Chapter 4 in the book. Note that indicators of organizational distress are included in the next document.
  • Measures of Organizational Distress (PDF: 45KB): This document includes a set of measures aimed to develop information about sources of stress in organization as well as some sources of stress outside the organization that can spill over into the workplace. The document includes organizational indicators of distress as discussed in Chapter 5 in the book.
  • Stress Modifiers and Coping Measures (PDF: 126KB): This document includes a set of measures aimed to develop information about mediating and moderating variables in the stress process, such as Type A Behavior Pattern and Personality Hardiness. Measures of both modifiers and coping are included, and they parallel material covered in Chapter 3 of the book.
  • The Leadership Battery┬« (PDF: 139KB): This document includes a set of five assessments for organizational members interested in better understanding their psychological preferences, emotional competencies, leadership style strengths, interpersonal deeds, and styles of attachment.